Learning from multiple annotators

I recently prepared a deck of slides for my machine learning course. In the presentation, I talk about some of the recently proposed methods on learning from multiple annotators. In these methods we do not assume the labels that we get from the annotators to be the ground truth, as we do in traditional machine learning, but try to find “truth” from noisy data.

There are two main directions of work in this area. One focuses on finding the consensus labels first and then do traditional learning, while the other approach is to learn a consensus model directly. In the second approach, we may estimate the consensus labels during the process of building a classifier itself.

Here are the slides for the presentation. I would be happy to receive your comments and suggestions.

Quoc Le’s Lectures on Deep Learning

Update:  Dr. Le has posted tutorials on this topic: Part 1 and Part 2.

Dr. Quoc Le from the Google Brain project team (yes, the one that made headlines for creating a cat recognizer) presented a series of lectures at the Machine Learning Summer School (MLSS ’14) in Pittsburgh this week. This is my favorite lecture series from the event till now and I was glad to be able to attend them.

The good news is that the organizers have made available the entire set of video lectures in 4K for you to watch. But since Dr. Le did most of them on a blackboard and did not provide any accompanying slides, I decided to put the brief content descriptions of the lectures along with the videos here. Hope this will help you navigate the videos better.

Lecture 1: Neural Networks Review

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Dr. Le begins his lecture starting from the fundamentals on Neural Networks if you’d like to brush up your knowledge about them. Otherwise feel free to quickly skim through the initial sections, but I promise there are interesting things later on. You may use the links below to skip to the relevant parts. The links are using an experimental script, let me know in the comments if they don’t work.

Contents


Lecture 2: NNs in Practice

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If you have already covered NN in the past then the first lecture may have been a bit dry for you but the real fun begins in this lecture when Dr. Le starts talking about his experiences of using deep learning in practice.

Contents


Lecture 3: Deep NN Architectures

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In this lecture, Dr. Le finishes his description on NN architectures. He also talks a bit about how they are being used at Google – for applications in image and speech recognition, and language modelling.

Contents


Machines understand Rahul Gandhi!

I have a (bad) habit of checking my Twitter feed while at work. Yesterday after my machine learning class, I found my timeline to be filled with Tweets mocking Rahul Gandhi about his first-ever television interview. Naturally, I was curious to know why and I tried to give it a listen. Most of his answers made no sense to me whatsoever! But then guess what? Who else is bad at responding to questions in natural language? The machines are! Maybe it was time to put them to a test and see if the machines could understand Mr. Gandhi. Making use of the transcript made available by the Times of India and some free NLP tools(ets), I spent a couple of hours (unproductive, ofcourse :P) trying to make sense of the interview.

Here’s a wordle summary of his answers, that would at least give you an overview about what was being spoken about during the interview:

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Such system. Many people. Wow! Apparently the word ‘system’ was used 70 times during the entire interview.

Here are some of the most used (best) words from the transcript. The number times they were used are mentioned in parenthesis.

  1. system (70)
  2. people (66)
  3. going (52)
  4. party (51)
  5. country (44)
  6. want (34)
  7. congress (34)
  8. power (32)
  9. political (31)
  10. issue (26)

Next, I set out to generate a summary of his answers. And lo! to my surprise, it made perfect sense (contrary to what you usually get from a summarizer). This is the summary generated from the online tool at http://freesummarizer.com/:

What I feel is that this country needs to look at the fundamental issues at hand, the fundamental political issue at hand is that our Political system is controlled by too few people and we absolutely have to change the way our political system is structured, we have to change our Political parties, we have to make them more transparent, we have to change the processes that we use to elect candidates, we have to empower women in the political parties, that is where the meat of the issue but I don’t hear that discussion, I don’t hear the discussion about how are we actually choosing that candidate, that is never the discussion.

That ascribes huge power to the Congress party, I think the Congress party’s strength comes when we open up when we bring in new people, that is historically been the case and that is what I want to do.

The Gujarat riots took place frankly because of the way our system is structured, because of the fact that people do not have a voice in the system. And what I want to do. He was CM when Gujarat happened The congress party and the BJP have two completely different philosophies, our attack on the BJP is based on the idea that this country needs to move forward democratically, it needs push democracy deeper into the country, it needs to push democracy into the villagers, it needs to give women democratic powers, it needs to give youngsters democratic powers.

You are talking about India, we have had a 1 hour conversation here, you haven’t asked me 1 question about how we are going to build this country, how we are going to take this country forward, you haven’t asked me one question on how we are going to empower our people, you haven’t asked me one question on what we are going to do for youngsters, you are not interested in that.

There is the Congress Party that believes in openness, that believes in RTI, that believes in Panchayati Raj, that believes in giving people power. The Congress party is an extremely powerful system and all the Congress party needs to do is bring in younger fresher faces in the election which is what we are going to do and we are going to win the election.

In retrospect, repeating a few points several times is a good enough cue for an auto-summarizer to identify important sentences. This interview was perfect for a task like this as Mr. Gandhi repeated the same set of (rote) answers for almost every question that he was asked. Perhaps this is what he was hoping for? To make sure that when lazy journalists use automatic tools to do their jobs, it would give them a perfect output!

Now coming to the interesting bit. If you were a human listener like me and wanted to read the answers that he really did attempt to answer [1] , what would you do? Fear not! I have built an SVM classifier from this transcript that you could make use of in future. I used LightSide, an open source platform created by CMU LTI researchers to understand features from the transcript of his answers. Let’s get into the details then.

When you go for a interview, you could either choose to answer a question or try to avoid by cleverly diverting from the main question asked. In Rahul’s case, we have answers that can be mainly grouped into three categories – a) the questions that he answered, b) he managed to successfully avoid and c) the LOL category (the answer bears no resemblance to the question asked). I combined categories (b) and (c) to come up with classes: ANSWERED or UNANSWERED. You may check out my list of classes here and read the interview answers from the Times of India article here. They follow the same order as in the transcript with the exception of single line questions-answers that would’ve otherwise served as noise for machine learning. I selected a total of 114 questions in all out which 45 were answered and the remaining 69 were either successfully avoided or belonged to the LOL category [2] .

For feature extraction, I used quite simple language features like Bigrams, Trigrams, Line length after excluding stop words etc. You can download them in the LightSide feature format. I used the SVM plugin to learning the classification categories from the feature. Here is the final model that the tool built using the extracted features. And the results were surprising (or probably not :). With 10-fold cross validation, the resulting model had an accuracy of over 72%! An accuracy percentage like this is considered to be exceptional (in case you are not familiar with the field). The machines indeed understand Rahul Gandhi!

Unfortunately, I did not have enough data to run a couple of tests separately. We’ll have to probably wait for Mr. Gandhi to give his next interview for that. Hope that the Congress party members work as hard as the NLP researchers so that we can have a good competition by then!

Footnotes

  1. He did make an effort to answer about 40% of the questions to his credit ^
  2. These are solely based on my personal opinion. ^

Talk: The Signal Processing Approach to Biomarkers

A biomarker is a measurable indicator of a biological condition. Usually it is seen as a substance or a molecule introduced in the body but even physiological indicators may function as dynamic biomarkers for certain diseases. Dr. Sejdić and his team at the IMED Lab work on finding innovative ways to measure such biomarkers. During the ISP seminar last week, he presented his work on using low-cost devices with simple electronics such as accelerometers and microphones, to capture the unique patterns of physiological variables. It turns out that by analyzing these patterns, one can differentiate between healthy and pathological conditions. Building these devices requires an interdisciplinary investigation and insights from signal processing, biomedical engineering and also machine learning.

Listening to the talk, I felt that Dr. Sejdić is a researcher who is truly an engineer at heart as he described his work on building an Asperometer. It is a device that is placed on the throat of a patient to find out when they have swallowing difficulties (Dysphagia). The device picks up the vibrations from the throat and does a bit of signal processing magic to identify problematic scenarios. Do you remember the little flap called the Epiglotis that guards the entrance to your wind pipe, from your high school Biology? Well, that thing is responsible for directing the food into the oesophagus (food pipe) while eating and preventing it from going into wrong places (like the lungs!). As it moves to cover the wind pipe, it records a characteristic motion pattern on the accelerometer. The Asperometer can then distinguish between regular and irregular patterns to find out when should we be concerned. The current gold standard to do these assessments involve using some ‘Barium food’ and X-Rays to visualize its movement. As you may have realized, the Asperometer is not only unobstrusive but also appears to be a safer method to do so. There are a couple of issues left to iron out though, such as removing sources of noise in the signal due to speech or even breathing through the mouth. We can, however, still use it in controlled usage scenarios in the presence of a specialist.

The remaining part of the talk briefly dealt with Dr. Sejdić’s investigations of gait, handwriting processes and preference detection, again with the help of signal processing and some simple electronics on the body. He is building on work in biomedical engineering to study age and disease related changes in our bodies. The goal is to explore simple instruments providing useful information that can ultimately help to prevent, retard or reverse such diseases.

Talk: ISP Seminar

Turn-Taking Behavior in a Human Tutoring Corpus by Zahra Rahimi

In their research, Zahra and Homa, analyze turn-taking behavior between students in a human-human spoken tutoring system. This analysis could be helpful in understanding how users from different demographics interact with a tutor. In this study, they use sequences of speech and silence over time to mark ‘Active’ and ‘In-active’ states the dialogues between the tutor and the student. Considering both the tutor and student together we have four different combinations of these states, in which each one of them being active or inactive. The next step is to learn (using a semi-Markov process) a model from the dialogues. Using this model, they are able to measure the association of these models with features such as gender, scores obtained in the pre-test etc. The experiments provide some interesting results such as female students speak simultaneously longer with the tutor than male students; while their activities are less than their male counterparts. Also, for the students with a lower pre-test scores, the tutor tended to speak for longer time.

Content-Based Cross-Domain Recommendations Using Segmented Models by Shaghayegh Sahebi

Sherry presented her work on the job recommendation systems in her talk. This was done as part of her internship at LinkedIn last summer. The site originally used a single model to make job recommendations to the users by selecting features from their profiles. But, these profiles tend to vary a lot according to the job function the users play and the industry they are in. Professionals in academia, for example, may put a very different set of information on their resume as opposed to a banking executive. With this new study, they wish to segment users using these very features (current job function and industry etc.) before sending them to the recommender systems. This allows them to develop an efficient method of feature augmentation and adapt their algorithms.

The model was built and evaluated based on some pre-collected data. They evaluated the accuracy of the system in recommending the jobs that the users applied to. This, however, restricted them to a certain extent and an online A/B testing is still under process. We’ll have to wait and watch for the results to find out if they do better than the one-size-fits-all model that is currently in place.

Further Reading

  1. Z. Rahimi, Homa B. Hashemi “Turn-Taking Behavior in Human Tutoring Corpus.” AIED 2013. Available: http://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007%2F978-3-642-39112-5_111

Talk: Intelligent Tutoring Systems

Starting this week, I am adding a new feature on the blog. Every week I’ll be posting something about a talk or a colloquium that I attend. Serves as good talk notes, a writing practice and an assignment all in one full scoop? You bet it does!

The program that I am pursuing, Intelligent Systems Program provides a collaborative atmosphere for both students and faculty by giving them regular opportunities to present their research. It not only helps them gather feedback from others but also introduce their work to the new members of the program (like me!). As a part of these efforts, we have a series of talks called the ISP Colloquium Series.

For the first set of talks from the ISP Colloquium Series this semester, we had Mohammad Falakmasir and Roya Hosseini to present two of their award winning papers, both on Intelligent Tutoring Systems.

1. A Spectral Learning Approach to Knowledge Tracing by Mohammad Falakmasir

For developing intelligent tutoring systems that adapt to the student’s requirements, one would need a way to determine the student’s knowledge of skills being taught. This is commonly done by modeling it based on a couple of parameters. After learning from sequences of students’ responses to a quiz, one could predict the values of these parameters for future questions. This information could then be used to adapt the tutor to keep a pace that students are comfortable with. The paper proposes the use of a Spectral Learning [1] algorithm over other techniques such as Expectation Maximization (or EM) to estimate these parameters that model knowledge. EM is known to be a time consuming algorithm. The results of this paper show that similar or higher accuracy in prediction can be achieved while significantly improving the knowledge tracing time.

To design experiments with this new method, Mohammad and his co-authors analyzed data collected using a software-tutor. This tool was being used for an Introductory programming class at Pitt for over 9-semesters. They could then compare the performance of their new method over EM learning of parameters. They calculated both accuracy of prediction and root mean squared error as metrics for the comparison. Learning data was used from the first semester and tested against the second semester, and they could do this over and over again by learning data from the first-two semesters and predict the results from the third one and so on. This allowed them to back their results that show a time-improvement by a factor of 30(!), with a robust statistical analysis.

2. KnowledgeZoom for Java: A Concept-Based Exam Study Tool with a Zoomable Open Student Model by Roya Hosseini

Roya talks about open student modeling as opposed to a hidden one for modelling the students’ skills and knowledge. In her paper, she goes on to propose that a visual presentation of this model could be helpful during exam preparation. Using it one could quickly review the entire syllabus and identify the topics that need more work. I find it to be a very interesting concept and again something that I would personally like to use.

The authors designed a software tutor called Knowledge Zoom that could be used as an exam preparation tool for Java classes. It is based on a concept-level model of knowledge about Java and Object-oriented programming. Each question is associated with these concepts and specifies the pre-requisites that are needed to answer it. It also gives details on outcome concepts that could be mastered by working on a particular question. The students are provided with a zoom-able tree explorer that visually presents this information. Each node is represented using different sizes and colors that indicate the importance of the concept and the student’s knowledge in that area respectively. Another component of the tool provides students with a set of questions and adaptively recommends new questions. Based on the information from the ontology and indexing of the questions as discussed above, it can calculate how prepared a student is to attempt a particular question.

Evaluation of this method is done using a class-room study where students could use multiple tools (including KZ) to answer Java questions. They do a statistical analysis in comparison to the other tools that the features that KZ introduces. The results demonstrated that KZ helped students to reach their goals faster in moving from easy to harder questions. I was impressed by the fact that on top of these results, the authors decided to back it up with a subjective analysis by the students. Students preferred KZ over others by a great margin. They also received valuable feedback from them during this analysis.

While these tutors can currently support only concept-based subjects like programming and math where one could do by testing with objective-styled questions, the fact that we can intelligently adapt to a student’s pace of learning, is something that is really promising. I wish I could use some of these tools for learning my courses!

Footnotes

  1. You can find out more about spectral learning algorithms here: http://www.cs.cmu.edu/~ggordon/spectral-learning/. ^

Futher Reading

  1. M. H. Falakmasir, Z. A. Pardos, G. J. Gordon, P. Brusilovsky, A Spectral Learning Approach to Knowledge Tracing, In Proceedings of the 6th International Conference on Educational Data Mining. Memphis, TN, July 2013. Available: http://people.cs.pitt.edu/~falakmasir/images/EDMPaper2013.pdf
  2. Brusilovsky, P., Baishya, D., Hosseini, R., Guerra, J., & Liang, M.,“KnowledgeZoom for Java: A Concept-Based Exam Study Tool with a Zoomable Open Student Model”, ICALT 2013, Beijing, China. Available: http://people.cs.pitt.edu/~hosseini/papers/kz.pdf